Benjamin Hawkins Viatory
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Benjamin Hawkins Viatory

Descriptive Summary

Repository: Georgia Historical Society
Creator: John Whatley
Title: Benjamin Hawkins Viatory
Dates: 1954
Extent: 0.05 cubic feet (1 oversize folder)
Identification: MS 2365

Biographical/Historical Note

John Whatley was a resident of Bowdon, Georgia. An avid historian, during the winter of 1953-1954 he researched and sketched the viatory of Benjamin Hawkins (1754-1816) through Heard and Carroll Counties in Georgia. Hawkins was a farmer, statesman and Indian trader in Georgia from 1796 to 1816. He worked with the Creek Indians politically, agriculturally and in trade until his death in 1816.


Scope and Content Note

This collection contains one letter dated June 15, 1954 to Lilla M. Hawes, of the Georgia Historical Society, from John Whatley introducing the sketch of Benjamin Hawkins’ path through Heard County, Georgia; three sketches: one of the path through Heard County and two of the path through Carroll County, Georgia; and two pages of typed notes which correspond to the Heard County sketch.

These items were removed from the GHS map collection (1361-MP) during a 2009-2011 Institute for Museum and Library Services grant project and cataloged as an archival collection. The items are numbered 327, which corresponds to their original position in the GHS map collection.


Index Terms

Carroll County (Ga.)
Creek Indians.
Hawkins, Benjamin, 1754-1816.
Heard County (Ga.)
Letters (correspondence)
Sketch maps.
Trails.

Administrative Information

Processing information

This collection is processed at the Basic Level (or collection level). There is no detailed inventory for this collection as it is not fully processed. To request that this collection be added to our priority list of collections to be fully processed as staffing and funding allow, please contact the Library and Archives staff.


Restrictions

Access restrictions

The collection is open for research.


Sponsorship

Encoding funded by a 2008 Archives-Basic Projects grant from the National Historical Publications and Records Commission.