Beth Lattimore Reiter collection of Ardmore, Ardsley Park, and Chatham Crescent neighborhood records
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Beth Lattimore Reiter collection of Ardmore, Ardsley Park, and Chatham Crescent neighborhood records

Descriptive Summary

Repository: Georgia Historical Society
Creator: Reiter, Beth Lattimore.
Title: Beth Lattimore Reiter collection of Ardmore, Ardsley Park, and Chatham Crescent neighborhood records
Dates: 1909-1985
Extent: 1.0 cubic feet (1 box)
Identification: MS 1940

Biographical/Historical Note

Beth Lattimore Reiter is a native of Savannah, Georgia. She graduated from the University of Pennsylvania in 1968 with a B.A. in architectural history and then worked for the Historic Savannah Foundation, Inc. for six years. In 1977, she was named the Executive Director of the Savannah Landmark Rehabilitation Project, Inc. and held that position until 1980. Also, from 1974 to 1977 and after 1980, Reiter also worked as a free lance consultant in historic preservation conducting numerous architectural surveys throughout Georgia. She taught a course in historic preservation at Armstrong Atlantic State University, was a consultant to the Metropolitan Planning Commission for Preservation Planning, served as the first chairman of the Coastal Area Planning and Development Commission Preservation Advisory Committee, and was a member of the Board of Curators at the Georgia Historical Society.

Reiter's family has a rich tradition in southeast Georgia, having lived on the Georgia coast since the early 1800s. Her early ancestors worked as rice planters, sawmill operators, educators, and storekeepers. Her paternal grandfather, Harry Hays Lattimore (1874-1931) and his brother, William Lattimore were involved in real estate in Savannah and were responsible for the development of the Ardmore, Ardsley Park, and Chatham Crescent neighborhoods in the early 1900s.


Scope and Content Note

This collection contains records regarding the development of the Ardmore, Ardsley Park, and Chatham Crescent neighborhoods in Savannah, Georgia from 1909-1985. This material was collected by Beth Lattimore Reiter in her work to have Ardsley Park and Chatham Crescent neighborhoods recognized in the National Register of Historic Places. Included within this collection are photographs, clippings, tax records, accounts, plat maps, and correspondence from the Ardsley Park Land Corporation and Lattimore and Lattimore Realtors. These two organizations were vital in developing the property, advertising residences for sale in newspapers, and ultimately selling property to middle class and upper middle class citizens of Savannah. Of particular interest are the drafts of letters written by the members of the Ardsley Park Land Corporation in 1909 to the mayor and alderman of Savannah. Within this letter, the developers discuss moving the African American neighborhood which was regarded as "a most objectionable quarter," known as "Sunnyside" in order to create a new residential development to further the growth of the city outside of the historic and Victorian districts.


Index Terms

Accounts.
African American neighborhoods--Georgia--Savannah.
Ardmore (Savannah, Ga.)
Ardsley Park (Savannah, Ga.)
Ardsley Park Land Corporation (Savannah, Ga.)
Chatham Crescent (Savannah, Ga.)
Clippings (information artifacts)
Lattimore, Harry Hays, 1874-1931.
Lattimore, William, 1866-1934.
Letters (correspondence)
Neighborhoods--Georgia--Savannah.
Photographs.
Reiter, Beth Lattimore.
Tax records.

Administrative Information

Processing Information

This collection is processed at the Basic Level (or collection level). There is no detailed inventory for this collection as it is not fully processed. To request that this collection be added to our priority list of collections to be fully processed as staffing and funding allow, please contact the Library and Archives staff.


Restrictions

Access Restrictions

The collection is open for research.


Sponsorship

Encoding funded by a 2008 Archives-Basic Projects grant from the National Historical Publications and Records Commission.