Excerpt of Treatise on Marine and Naval Architecture
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Excerpt of Treatise on Marine and Naval Architecture

Descriptive Summary

Repository: Georgia Historical Society
Creator: John W. Griffiths, (John Willis), 1809-1882.
Title: Excerpt of Treatise on Marine and Naval Architecture
Dates: 1853
Extent: (1 folder) 0.05 cubic feet
Identification: MS 1655
Collection materials are in English.

Biographical/Historical Note

John Willis Griffiths ( 1809 – 1882) was an American naval architect who designed the first true clipper ship.


Scope and Content Note

This collection contains 10 pages from Treatise on Marine and Naval Architecture, or Theory and Practice Blended in Ship Building by John W. Griffiths, published by D. Appleton & Company in New York in 1853. The title page and verso are included as well as the frontispiece, which shows a black and white etching of the steamship Savannah. The remaining pages, numbered 345 to 348, pertain to the construction and structural composition of this same steamship, which was the first steamer to cross the Atlantic when it traversed from Savannah to Liverpool in 1819.


Index Terms

Naval architecture.
Savannah (Steamship)
Shipbuilding.

Administrative Information

Custodial History

Unknown.

Preferred Citation

Excerpt of Treatise on Marine and Naval Architecture, [collection number], Georgia Historical Society, Savannah, Georgia.

Acquisition Information

Unknown.


Restrictions

Access Restrictions

Collection is open for research.

Publication Rights

Copyright has not been assigned to the Georgia Historical Society. All requests for permission to publish or quote from manuscripts must be submitted in writing to the Division of Library and Archives. Permission for publication is given on behalf of the Georgia Historical Society as the owner of the physical items and is not intended to include or imply permission of the copyright holder, which must also be obtained by the researcher.


Sponsorship

Encoding funded by a 2012 Documenting Democracy grant from the National Historical Publications and Records Commission.